Instability in families increases

This longitudinal study shows that ‎40% of the parents were not in a legally binding relationship – this simply increases the risk of instability in families and separation of the parents. Social fallout will continue as we minimise the importance and value of marriage.

It is also significant to notice that mums are planning on going back to work but would prefer not to.

The changing face of New Zealand
NZ Herald Nov 26, 2010
New Zealand will look like a much different place in the future, if the early results of a longitudinal study are anything to go by. The Growing Up In New Zealand study of more than 7000 children born in the last two years and their families released its first report today. A longitudinal study involves repeated observations of the same items over long periods of time. The report, Before We Were Born, interviewed the parents of the children during pregnancy, finding the families very different from those of previous generations. The average age of parents having children was greater than 30, a third of children were born to a parent that did not grown up in New Zealand, 60 per cent of the parents were in a legally binding relationship and an increasing number of children were born into varied family structures.
…. The parents said they would like to take more leave after their child’s birth.

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