Parental notification lowers teen abortion rate – US study

From LifeSite news

A new analysis of abortion data across all 50 U.S. states has found solid evidence that legislation intended to reduce abortion, such as parental involvement laws, is effective. Michael New, Ph.D., an assistant professor of political science at the University of Alabama, recently published the survey entitled “Analyzing the Effect of Anti-Abortion U.S. State Legislation in the Post-Casey Era” in State Politics and Policy Quarterly, the top state politics journal in the country. The study evaluated abortion data from nearly every state over a span of 21 years, from 1985 to 2005, a longer period than nearly any other peer-reviewed study. New drew from both the Centers for Disease Control and the Alan Guttmacher Institute, whose data on abortion rates provided what New found was a clear indication that Medicaid abortion funding restrictions, parental involvement laws and informed consent laws effectively lower abortion rates. Parental involvement laws specifically were found to reduce in-state abortion rates for minors by approximately 15 percent.

Family First is promoting parental notification laws and informed consent for women considering an abortion. This evidence proves that the laws would be a step in the right direction to lower both our teen abortion rates, teen pregnancy rates, and also our overall abortion rate – and is supported by a large majority of NZ’ers.

Women deserve the right to be fully informed.

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2 comments for “Parental notification lowers teen abortion rate – US study

  1. 30 March 2011 at 12:45 pm

    Parental involvement laws specifically were found to reduce in-state abortion rates for minors by approximately 15 percent.

    Does that mean that children who wanted abortions had them in other states?

    And what’s the effect on the teen parent rate?

  2. 5 July 2012 at 6:21 am

    I wonder what kind of parental involvement made the reduction of abortion in teens effective. I hate to imagine the worst but when a very trying situation comes in the best of families, what choices are made really?

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