Cannabis lollipops, soft drinks and protein powder could be on the market for Kiwis following cannabis referendum

NZ Herald 4 December 2019
Family First Comment: “But it is confectionery items like chocolates, lollipops, gummy lollies and soft drinks, that have raised the ire of Family First, with spokesman Bob McCoskrie saying such products could be targeted at children. Opposition lobby group Say Nope to Dope, of which Family First is a part, has run giant billboards throughout the year against the referendum, including a series featuring a deep green gummy bear smoking a joint.”

If the international market is anything to go by getting high off lollipops, gummy lollies, soft drinks and even protein powder could be an option following next year’s cannabis referendum.

The Government yesterday announced the draft Cannabis Legalisation and Control Bill, designed to govern the recreational cannabis market should it come into effect.

The legislation specifies a minimum age of 20 to use or purchase a recreational cannabis product, and prohibits consumption in public spaces, among many other measures.

But two aspects have raised more questions than others – the inclusion of edible products, and a 14g carry limit.

In legal cannabis markets overseas cannabis edibles have gone well past the traditional brownies, to everything from protein powder, beer, and even THC-infused beef jerky.

But it is confectionery items like chocolates, lollipops, gummy lollies and soft drinks, that have raised the ire of Family First, with spokesman Bob McCoskrie saying such products could be targeted at children.

Opposition lobby group Say Nope to Dope, of which Family First is a part, has run giant billboards throughout the year against the referendum, including a series featuring a deep green gummy bear smoking a joint.

National’s drug and alcohol spokeswoman Paula Bennett said she was concerned about youth still accessing cannabis.

“Young people are still going to try it, but they will be getting it from the black market.”

In introducing the draft legislation, which will be open to submissions, Justice Minister Andrew Little said the primary objective was to “reduce overall cannabis use and limit the ability of young people to access cannabis”.
READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=12290788

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